Cardus brought poetry to the craft of cricket journalism

Neville Cardus educated at Jesuit school in Bombay 1961 and his essay on Ranji, the Indian cricketer the star of 19th century  was part of the English curriculum. Ranji who played for Sussex displayed his magic against Yorkshire. Neville Cardus lived in Baker Street flat, was lonely and feared destitution, as Duncan Hamilton reveals in…

£107m aid for sub-standard Pakistan schools

  School construction works on nine out of ten schools in Pakistan, a £107m project funded by the UK’s Department for International Development are not fit for purpose leaving 115, 000 children in makeshift classrooms. Internal Dfid documents reveal that new renovated facilities at 1, 277 of the 1, 389 schools covered by the programme…

Does Beethoven makes his audience political?

In 1824, Beethoven, at the premiere of his Ninth Symphony the Viennese gave the performance five standing ovations. Only the Austrian emperor ( who  got three) enjoyed this but fearful of subversion, a panicked police commissioner had to shush them into silence. Last month, the same symphony’s “Ode to Joy” theme drifted from the floor…

Exodus crisis facing Catholic Church

    The Second Vatican Council opened in 1962 by Pope John XXIII. With the prophecy that “a new day is dawning on Church, bathing her in radiant splendor” The identity of the Catholic media, about strict adherence to the church’s teachings, especially on marriage and sexual morals or is it a more liberal approach,…

Unsocial digital life

Ji Tolentino is The New Yorker’s professional millennial journalist, in an era of malleable truth and widespread political delusion,  who  writes both contemporary and classical from social media to the gig economy, enhanced the pages of the old magazine with Zeitgeist animated essays, reports from the trenches of today’s gender wars. Her new book Trick…

“Manuals viewed all punctuation as pauses of different lengths”

A biography of much misunderstood punctuation mark and a call to arms in favour of clear expression and against stifling grammar rules. The most recent edition of Chicago manual runs to a 1026 pages and contains 38 semicolon, Cecelia Watson began teach and that was when she realised that strict rules aren’t always the best…

A little girl’s disappearance investigated by her daughter

In search of truth a story with great depth and tenderness and revelation of how art enriches life. Betty Elston was three years old when she disappeared  one day in October 1929 from Lincolnshire beach below the house where she lived.  She was found again by police, unharmed, some miles away, a few days later. …

Peterloo: When British state turned on its people

The English uprising of 1819 in Manchester when the English pro-democracy movement met its waterloo. An unforgettable portrait of Regency Manchester, its corruption, its riots, its strikes and its attempted uprisings.                   The Peterloo Massacre by  on August 16,  2019 will mark 200th anniversary of a moment tens of thousands of people made their way on…

Spain’s crisis recovery

Spain took the brunt of the 2008 financial crisis as overnight the money dried up and the country’s speculative housing boom imploded prompting investors to flee. Even banks went to the wall with loss of millions of jobs.  Tobias Buck arrive d in 2012, in the midst of country’s devastating financial crisis. Many young Spaniards…

“Find Your Strength and Sparkle Your Way to the Top”

  Michelle, an American-Italian Diva, is not your average Diva, advices readers to “ Keep Your Shit Together”, “ Give Good Face” and “Be Thankful You’re a Misfit” Michelle Diva’s book give powerful positive and polished tips from her vogueing days in downtown Manhattan clunes in the 90s to her successful career in radio and…